Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes (SLO) is a means to determine what students know, think, feel or do as a result of a given learning experience. Learn more about SLO.


Mathematics - 50 - 51 - 51A - 51B - 61 - 71 - 71A - 71B - 71X - 96
       - 100 - 110 - 110H - 120 - 130 - 140 - 150 - 160 - 180 - 181 - 210 - 280 - 285
Computer Science - 110 - 140 - 145 - 150 - 170 - 190 - 210 - 220 - 230


Computer Science

CSCI 110

  1. Students will be able to use and differentiate between basic concepts of computer hardware and software.
  2. Students will be able to use data representation for the fundamental data types and perform conversions between binary-hexadecimal-decimal representations.
  3. Students will be able to read, understand and trace the execution of programs written in C language.
  4. For a given algorithm students will be able to write the C code using a modular approach.

CSCI 140

  1. Students will be able to analyze problems and design algorithms in pseudo code.
  2. Students will be able to read, understand and trace the execution of programs written in C++ language.
  3. Students will be able to use given classes and virtual functions in a class hierarchy to create new derived classes and the code that uses them.
  4. For a given algorithm students will be able to write modular C++ code using classes in an OOP approach.

CSCI 145

  1. Students will be able to analyze problems and design appropriate algorithms.
  2. Students will be able to code provided algorithms using Java language.
  3. Students will be able to provide code for a Java class given objects’ attributes and behaviors.
  4. Students will be able to use existing Java classes to perform required tasks.

CSCI 150

  1. Students will be able to manipulate data at the bit and byte levels.
  2. Students will be able to identify the components of a computer and the organization of those components.
  3. Students will be able to describe disk storage systems and file systems.
  4. Students will be able to use assembly language instructions to write small programs.

CSCI 170

  1. Students will be able do basic UNIX OS administration tasks, including account management.
  2. Students will be able to use the Unix file system
  3. Students will be able to perform basic UNIX networking tasks including setting up a LAN using NIS
  4. Students will be able to use Unix programming tools: compilers, Make utility, debugger, profiler, version control.
  5. Students will be able to read-understand-write short scripts in a Unix shell.

CSCI 190

  1. Students will be able to use truth table for propositional calculus.
  2. Students will be able to use math induction and recursive definitions and algorithms.
  3. Students will be able to understand the terminology of finite graphs and trees and use the basic algorithms for traversal, shortest path, graph coloring.
  4. Students will be able to use basic counting techniques, combinatorics concepts and binomial coefficients.

CSCI 210

  1. Students will be able to use Boolean algebra for algebraic simplification.
  2. Students will be able to use truth tables, maps, and tabular reduction methods in combinational network design.
  3. Students will be able to use state tables and diagrams in sequential network design.
  4. Students will be able to differentiate between combinational and sequential logic networks.

CSCI 220

  1. Students will be able to analyze problems and select the appropriate data structure.
  2. Students will be able to estimate running time given an algorithm.
  3. Students will be able to implement and use linear data structures including sets, stacks, queues, and lists.
  4. Students will be able to implement and use trees including binary tree, binary search trees, and heaps.

CSCI 230

  1. Students will be able to implement efficient searching techniques including hash tables and skip lists.
  2. Students will be able to implement and analyze running time for various sorting algorithms.
  3. Students will be able to represent graphs and implement well-known graph algorithms.
  4. Students will be able to differentiate the costs between memory access and disk access.
 
 
 
Mathematics & Computer Science
Building 61
(909)594-5611 ext. 4652